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What file system should I use to create a partition?

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helpdeskgeek.comИзображение:helpdeskgeek.comCreate partition scheme for dual boot Linux You can use GParted First create an extended partition in the whole disk, then create four logical partitions, using this scheme. Swap (Maybe 4 Giga bytes read how much swap)
SSD has no moving parts comparing to HDD, yet you can still partition it for multiple tasks. There is a large part of user hope to partition hard disk for dual boot. They have benefited from the SSD and want to get more from this disk. As mentioned before, SSDs come with large capacity recently, which makes OS dual boot on SSD possible. How to Create a Partition in Linux? Using the command mode. Once we enter the command mode, many beginners might get confused due to the unfamiliarCreating a partition. Our main objective here is to create a partition. To create a new partition, we use the commandSetting the partition type. Once we create a partition, Linux sets the default partition type as More Use the NTFS file system (the default these days), which does a pretty good job of optimizing for speed, space, and reliability, and won’t restrict the size of your partition.

How to dual boot Windows and other OS?

If want to dual boot Windows and other OS like Linux or Mac, you might as well turn to third party partitioning software like AOMEI Partition Assistant Professional. This software allows you to create a partition based on NTFS, FAT32, FAT, EXT2 or EXT3 for different systems.

Is it possible to partition hard disk for dual boot?

There is a large part of user hope to partition hard disk for dual boot. They have benefited from the SSD and want to get more from this disk. As mentioned before, SSDs come with large capacity recently, which makes OS dual boot on SSD possible. For user who has upgraded Windows 7 to Windows 10, dual boot is a good way to back to familiar OS.

How do I create a partition in Linux?

First create an extended partition in the whole disk, then create four logical partitions, using this scheme. First Linux distribution (It may be 30% of the disk, disks are really big now, modify according to your needs) Share partition (Rest of the disk, this may be your /home partition, but I recommend you name it /sharing)

What file system should I use to create a partition?

Third, you can see that the partition it is going to create for Linux will be formatted with the ext4 file system. That's a good general-purpose choice, especially if you are a novice Linux user.

What file system should I use to create a partition?

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